2009-08-19

Anzac tart with macadamia praline & cinnamon syrup

Anzac tart with macadamia praline & cinnamon syrup

Anzac tart with macadamia praline & cinnamon syrup


Enlist crunchy Anzac biscuits in the crust of this terrific tart that's topped with praline.


Cooking Time

25 minutes

Ingredients (serves 8)

  • 250g Anzac biscuits
  • 100g butter, melted
  • 1 x 395g can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 x 300ml ctn thin cream
  • 2 tbs honey
  • 140g (2/3 cup) caster sugar
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) water
  • 1 x 7cm cinnamon stick
  • 1 tbs honey, extra

  • Praline

  • 80g (1/2 cup) roasted macadamia nuts, coarsely chopped
  • 155g (3/4 cup) caster sugar
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) water

Method

  1. Place the biscuits in the bowl of a food processor and process until finely crushed. Add the butter and process until combined. Transfer to a 24cm (base measurement) fluted tart tin, with removable base. Use a glass to press mixture firmly over base and side of pan. Transfer to the freezer.
  2. Use an electric beater to beat the condensed milk, cream and honey in a large bowl until the mixture has tripled in volume. Pour over the biscuit base and smooth the surface. Place in the freezer overnight to set.
  3. Meanwhile, to make the praline, line a baking tray with non-stick baking paper. Spread the macadamia nuts over the tray. Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan over low heat. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes or until the sugar dissolves. Increase heat to medium and bring to a simmer. Cook, without stirring, brushing down the side of pan with a brush dipped in water, for 8 minutes or until golden. Pour over the macadamias. Set aside to cool. Break into shards.
  4. Combine the sugar, water and cinnamon stick in a saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes or until the sugar dissolves. Bring to a simmer. Cook, without stirring, for 5 minutes or until syrup thickens. Remove from heat. Stir in extra honey. Set aside for 15 minutes to cool. Remove the cinnamon stick.
  5. Top the tart with praline shards and drizzle over cinnamon syrup to serve.

Source


Good Taste - January 2007, Page 91
Recipe by Alison Adams


Aniseed & chocolate parfait

Aniseed & chocolate parfait

Aniseed & chocolate parfait


Prepare for an explosion of flavours as the layers of this dessert melt in your mouth.


Preparation Time

10 minutes



Cooking Time

5 minutes

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 100g dark chocolate, chopped
  • 1 x 300ml ctn thickened cream
  • 1 egg, separated
  • 2 tbs caster sugar
  • 125g mascarpone
  • 8 Unibic aniseed cake biscuits, chopped
  • 80ml (1/3 cup) chilled espresso coffee
  • Cocoa powder, to dust

Method

  1. Combine the chocolate and one-third of the cream in a heatproof bowl over a saucepan half-filled with simmering water (make sure the bowl doesn't touch the water). Cook, stirring with a metal spoon, for 5 minutes or until the chocolate melts and the mixture is smooth.
  2. Use an electric beater to whisk the egg white in a clean dry bowl until soft peaks form.
  3. Use a balloon whisk to whisk together the egg yolk and sugar in a medium bowl until pale and creamy. Stir in the mascarpone.
  4. Use an electric beater to whisk the remaining cream in a bowl until soft peaks form. Fold into the egg yolk mixture. Add the egg white and gently fold until just combined.
  5. Place the biscuits in a bowl and drizzle with the coffee. Spoon half the biscuit mixture evenly among serving glasses. Top with half the chocolate sauce and half the cream mixture. Continue layering with remaining biscuits, chocolate mixture and cream mixture. Dust with cocoa to serve.

Source


Good Taste - November 2006, Page 55
Recipe by Gemma Purcell


Amaretto cream & praline with fruit

Amaretto cream & praline with fruit

Amaretto cream & praline with fruit


Preparation Time

5 minutes

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 100g (1/2 cup) caster sugar
  • 50g (1/3 cup) toasted slivered almonds (Ducks brand)
  • Strawberries, pear slices and dates, to serve

  • Amaretto cream

  • 250g mascarpone
  • 2 tbs amaretto liqueur
  • 2 tbs icing sugar mixture

Method

  1. Line a baking tray with non-stick baking paper. Place the sugar in a small frying pan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes or until sugar dissolves and caramelises. Remove from heat. Add the almonds and stir until well combined. Pour onto prepared tray and set aside for 10 minutes to cool.
  2. Meanwhile: to make the amaretto cream, place the mascarpone, amaretto and icing sugar mixture in a bowl and stir until well combined.
  3. Break up the almond toffee. Place in the bowl of a food processor and process until coarsely chopped.
  4. Transfer the amaretto cream to a serving bowl and sprinkle with praline. Serve with strawberries, pear slices and dates, if desired.

Source


Good Taste - August 2005, Page 95
Recipe by Sarah Hobbs


Amaretto cheesecake

Amaretto cheesecake

Amaretto cheesecake


Ingredients (serves 8)

  • 2 cups crushed digestive biscuits
  • 1 tbs good-quality cocoa powder, sifted
  • 90g unsalted butter, melted
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup (220g) caster sugar
  • 675g ricotta cheese
  • 1/2 cup (125ml) sour cream
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) amaretto (see note)
  • 1/4 cup plain flour
  • 1/2 cup (125ml) thickened cream, whipped
  • 3 eggwhites
  • 200g good-quality dark chocolate, chopped

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 160°C. Lightly grease a 23cm springform pan. Cover the outer base and sides of the pan with a double layer of foil. Combine the biscuit crumbs, cocoa and butter, then spread the mixture over the base and 2cm up the sides of the prepared pan.
  2. Process the egg yolks, vanilla and sugar in a food processor. Add the ricotta, sour cream, amaretto and flour, and process until smooth. Place the mixture in a mixing bowl and fold through the whipped cream. Beat the eggwhites until soft peaks form, then fold into mixture, making sure it's well combined. Finally, fold in half the chocolate. Place in prepared pan, then sit in a deep baking dish. Pour boiling water into baking dish so it comes halfway up sides of pan. Bake for 1 hour, turn the oven off and leave to cool completely, then refrigerate for a minimum of 1 hour.
  3. To serve, place the remaining chocolate in a bowl over a pan of simmering water (making sure the bowl doesn't touch water) and stir until chocolate melts. Cool slightly, then serve slices of cheesecake drizzled with the melted chocolate.

Notes & tips

  • Amaretto is from bottle shops.

Source


delicious. - May 2004, Page 92
Recipe by Valli Little


Amaretto brulee

Amaretto brulee

Amaretto brulee


Preparation Time

15 minutes


Cooking Time

40 minutes

Ingredients (serves 6)

  • 625ml (2 1/2 cups) thin cream
  • 1 vanilla bean, split
  • 7 egg yolks
  • 100g (1/2 cup) caster sugar
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) amaretto liqueur
  • 2 tbs brown sugar

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 150°C. Place six 185ml (3/4-cup) capacity ovenproof ramekins in a large roasting pan.
  2. Place the cream and vanilla bean in a saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes or until mixture comes to a simmer (do not boil). Strain through a sieve into a heatproof jug. Use a small knife to scrape vanilla seeds from the bean into cream. Discard bean.
  3. Meanwhile, use a balloon whisk to whisk together the egg yolks, caster sugar and amaretto in a bowl until well combined.
  4. Whisk the hot cream mixture into the egg-yolk mixture. Pour evenly among ramekins. Pour enough boiling water into the pan to reach halfway up the sides of the ramekins.
  5. Cook in oven for 30 minutes or until just set. Remove ramekins from roasting pan and set aside for 2 hours to cool. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for 6 hours to set.
  6. Preheat grill on high. Sprinkle brulees with brown sugar. Cook under preheated grill, about 6cm from heat source, for 2-3 minutes or until sugar bubbles and caramelises. Serve immediately.

Source


Good Taste - August 2005, Page 95
Recipe by Sarah Hobbs


Amaretto apples with white chocolate risotto

Amaretto apples with white chocolate risotto

Amaretto apples with white chocolate risotto


Caramelised apple is deliciously luscious atop warm cinnamon-infused rice.


Preparation Time

15 minutes


Cooking Time

40 minutes

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 60g butter
  • 2 tbs brown sugar
  • 2 Royal Gala apples, unpeeled, cut into 5mm-thick slices
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) Amaretto liqueur

  • White chocolate risotto

  • 1.25L (5 cups) milk
  • 1 x 6cm cinnamon stick
  • Pinch of ground nutmeg
  • 40g butter, chopped
  • 220g (1 cup) arborio rice
  • 100g white chocolate, finely chopped
  • 55g (1/4 cup) caster sugar

Method

  1. To make the white chocolate risotto, bring the milk, cinnamon and nutmeg just to the boil in a saucepan. Reduce heat to low and hold at a gentle simmer.
  2. Heat the butter in a medium heavy-based saucepan over medium heat until foaming. Add the rice and cook, stirring, for 3 minutes or until the grains appear slightly glassy.
  3. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add a ladleful (about 125ml/1/2 cup) of the simmering milk mixture to the rice and stir constantly with a wooden spoon until the liquid is absorbed. Continue to add the milk mixture, a ladleful at a time, stirring constantly and allowing the liquid to be absorbed before adding the next ladleful, for 35 minutes or until the rice is tender yet firm to the bite and the risotto is creamy.
  4. Add chocolate and sugar and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes or until chocolate melts and the mixture is well combined.
  5. Meanwhile, melt butter in a non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Stir in the sugar. Add apple and half the Amaretto. Cook, turning once, for 5 minutes or until tender. Stir in the remaining Amaretto.
  6. Divide the risotto among serving bowls. Top with the apple slices and drizzle over the sauce to serve.

Source


Good Taste - July 2007, Page 89
Recipe by Gemma Purcell


Amaretti cheesecakes with morello cherries and strawberries

Amaretti cheesecakes with morello cherries and strawberries

Amaretti cheesecakes with morello cherries and strawberries


Ingredients (serves 6)

  • 75g amaertti biscuits
  • 140g unsalted butter (40g melted, 100g softened)
  • 185g caster sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp finely grated meon rind
  • 2 eggs
  • 125g self-raising flour
  • 1/2 cup (100g) pitted morello cherries in syrup, plus 1 cup reserved syrup
  • 250g strawberries, sliced withways

  • Filling

  • 150g goat's curd, mascarpone or softened cream cheese
  • 125g chreme fraiche
  • 1/2 cup (110g) caster sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 egg yolk

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 170°C. Grease a 6-hole (3/4 capacity) Texas muffin tin, then line bases with baking paper. Process amaretti in a food processor until fine crumbs form. Add 40g metled butter and process until larger clumps form. Press crumb mixture firmly into bases of prepared muffin holes. Regrigerate while making filling.
  2. For the filling: whisk together all the ingredients in a bowl, then set aside.
  3. Using an electric mixer, beat remaining 100g softened butter, 75g sugar, vanilla and meon rind in a bowl until light and fluffy. Add eggs and beat until incorporated, then add flour and beat until combined. Pour mixture over crumbs in muffin tin, then spread halfway up side of holes. Spoon filling into centres - don't worry about being too precise. Bake in oven for 20 minutes or until lighlty browned. Set aside in tin to cool completely (cheesecake will sink slightly on standing).
  4. Combine: remianing 110g sugar and morello syrup in a small saucepan. Simmer over medium heat until reduced to about 3/4 cup and slightly syrupy. Set aside to cool completely. Top cheesecakes with cherries and strawberries, then drizzle with syrup to serve.

Source


Notebook: - October 2006, Page 133
Recipe by Sophia Young


Almond tuiles

Almond tuiles

Almond tuiles


Makes

6



Ingredients

  • 2 eggwhites
  • 1/3 cup (75g) caster sugar
  • 1/3 cup (50g) plain flour, sifted
  • 50g unsalted butter, melted, cooled
  • 2/3 cup (50g) fl aked almonds

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 190°C. Lightly grease the outside of 2 dariole moulds with a little oil. Line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. Combine eggwhites and caster sugar in a bowl. Add the fl our and the cooled melted butter, and stir with a wooden spoon. Stir in nuts. Using 2 tablespoons of batter for each, spread two 12cm circles on the prepared tray. Bake the tuiles for 5 minutes or until lightly browned. Working quickly, lift the tuiles off the tray using a palette knife and press over the outside of the greased dariole moulds to form dish shapes, then allow to cool on the mould for 30 seconds until hardened. Repeat twice more with the remaining batter.

Source


delicious. - October 2006, Page 70
Recipe by Valli Little

Almond jelly with fruit

Almond jelly with fruit

Almond jelly with fruit


Ingredients (serves 6)

  • 3 gold-strength gelatine leaves (see note)
  • 1 cup (220g) caster sugar
  • 300ml pure (thin) cream
  • 1 1/2 tsp almond extract
  • 1 vanilla bean, split, seeds scraped
  • Fruit salad (such as honey dew, mango and pawpaw) and mint leaves, to serve

Method

  1. Begin this recipe a day ahead. Soak the gelatine leaves in cold water for 5 minutes to soften. Meanwhile, place 90g of the caster sugar in a pan over low heat with 200ml cold water, then stir to dissolve sugar. Squeeze excess water from the gelatine, then add the leaves to the syrup. Remove from the heat and stir to dissolve. Place cream, almond extract and 100ml water in a bowl. Add gelatine mix and stir to combine. Transfer to a 20cm round cake pan (not springform) or glass dish. Cover and chill overnight until set.
  2. Place the remaining 130g sugar, vanilla pod and seeds, and 1/2 cup (125ml) water in a small saucepan over low heat. Stir to dissolve the sugar, then simmer, without stirring, for 2-3 minutes until syrupy. Cool, then discard pod. Divide fruit among serving plates, cut jelly into triangles, then place on top of fruit. Drizzle with vanilla syrup and serve scattered with mint.

Notes & tips

  • Gelatine leaves are from gourmet food shops.

Source


delicious. - February 2007, Page 68
Recipe by Valli Little



Almond & pear tartlets with honeycomb ice-cream

Almond & pear tartlets with honeycomb ice-cream

Almond & pear tartlets with honeycomb ice-cream


Chunks of honeycomb and a drizzle of honey turn vanilla ice-cream into a special treat to enjoy with your fruity dessert.


Preparation Time

20 - 140 minutes


Cooking Time

15 minutes

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 1L vanilla ice-cream, softened
  • 1 x 50g bar Nestle Violet Crumble, coarsely chopped
  • 1 1/2 tbs honey
  • 1 sheet (25 x 25cm) frozen ready-rolled puff pastry, just thawed (see tip)
  • 1 egg, lightly whisked
  • 1 x 410g can pear halves in natural juice, drained
  • 35g (1/3 cup) flaked almonds
  • 1 tbs caster sugar

Method

  1. Combine the ice-cream, Violet Crumble and honey in a large bowl. Return the mixture to the ice-cream container. Place in the freezer for 2 hours or until firm.
  2. Preheat oven to 200°C. Line a baking tray with non-stick baking paper. Use a 10.5cm-diameter fluted round pastry cutter to cut 4 discs from the pastry. Place the pastry discs on the lined tray.
  3. Brush the discs with the egg. Place 1 pear half in the centre of each disc.
  4. Combine the almonds and sugar in a bowl. Sprinkle evenly over the pastries. Bake in oven for 15 minutes or until the pastry is puffed and golden. Serve warm with a scoop of the honeycomb ice-cream.

Notes & tips

  • Don't thaw the pastry completely or it will be too soft and difficult to work with.
  • As a healthier alternative to the honeycomb ice-cream, try serving these tartlets with reduced-fat vanilla yoghurt.

Source


Good Taste - September 2008, Page 54
Recipe by Wendy Quisumbing


Almond meringues with strawberry cream

Almond meringues with strawberry cream

Almond meringues with strawberry cream


Ingredients (serves 6)

  • 2 egg whites
  • 1/2 cup (100g) caster sugar, plus 2 tbs extra
  • 2 tbs flaked almonds
  • 250g punnet strawberries, washed, hulled, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup (250ml) double cream

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 120°C. Line an oven tray with baking paper. Use an electric mixer to whisk the egg whites until firm peaks form. Add sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, whisking well between each addition. Continuing whisking for 2 minutes or until sugar dissolves.
  2. Spoon tablespoonfuls of meringue mixture on to the lined tray. Sprinkle with almonds. Bake in preheated oven for 1 hour or until meringues are dry and crisp. Turn oven off and leave in oven, with door ajar, until cooled to room temperature.
  3. Meanwhile, combine strawberries and extra sugar in a saucepan over low heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until sugar dissolves and strawberries release juices. Remove from heat and set aside to cool. Transfer to a bowl and place in the fridge to chill.
  4. Combine the cream and strawberry mixture in a bowl. Dip meringues in strawberry cream to serve.

Notes & tips

  • Transportation tip: Store meringues in an airtight container. Store strawberry cream in an airtight container and place in an esky.

Source


Notebook: - March 2007, Page 120
Recipe by Sarah Hobbs


Almond kulfi with rosewater syrup

Almond kulfi with rosewater syrup

Almond kulfi with rosewater syrup


Makes

8

Ingredients

  • 300ml pure cream
  • 300ml milk
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cardamom seeds
  • 2 x 395g cans condensed milk
  • 150g slivered almonds, toasted, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 cup caster sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon rosewater essence (see note)

Method

  1. Cut sixteen 2cm x 20cm strips of baking paper. Criss-cross 2 strips to line each of eight 3/4 cup-capacity texas muffin holes, allowing a 3cm overhang.
  2. Place cream, milk and cardamom seeds in a saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium-low heat. Remove from heat. Set aside for 15 minutes to allow flavours to develop.
  3. Strain mixture into a bowl. Add condensed milk. Using an electric mixer, beat for 5 to 10 minutes or until mixture is thick and creamy. Stir in three-quarters of the almonds. Pour mixture into prepared holes. Cover with plastic wrap. Freeze overnight to set.
  4. Place sugar and 1/4 cup of water in a medium saucepan over low heat. Cook, stirring, for 2 to 3 minutes or until sugar dissolves. Increase heat to medium. Cook without stirring for 5 minutes or until mixture thickens. Add rosewater. Stir to combine. Remove from heat. Allow to cool. Pour into a jug. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate if making the day before.
  5. Remove kulfi from freezer. Run a knife around holes. Using paper strips, lift kulfi from holes. Place on plates. Drizzle with rosewater mixture. Serve.

Notes & tips

  • Rosewater essence is made from distilled red and pink rose flowers. It's most notably used in Turkish delight and many Indian desserts. You can find rosewater essence in the baking aisle of the supermarket.
  • You could use orange blossom water instead of the rosewater essence, and unsalted pistachios instead of the almonds for a different flavour.

Source


Super Food Ideas - October 2007, Page 50
Recipe by Alison Adams


Almond cake with strawberries & caramel sauce

Almond cake with strawberries & caramel sauce

Almond cake with strawberries & caramel sauce


If you've got a special occasion to celebrate, then we've got the cake for you. Decorated with goeey caramel and berry "hearts", this moist cake is perfect!


Preparation Time

20 minutes


Cooking Time

55 minutes

Ingredients (serves 12)

  • Melted butter, to grease
  • 130g (1 1/4 cups) almond meal
  • 75g (1/2 cup) self-raising flour
  • 200g butter, at room temperature
  • 215g (1 cup) caster sugar
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla essence
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 x 300ml ctns double cream
  • 2 x 250g punnets strawberries, washed, hulled, sliced lengthways

  • Caramel sauce

  • 12 soft caramels (such as Pascall Columbines)
  • 80ml (1/3 cup) pouring cream

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C. Brush a round 20cm (base measurement) cake pan with melted butter to lightly grease. Line the base and side with non-stick baking paper. Combine the almond meal and flour in a bowl.
  2. Use an electric beater to beat the butter, sugar and vanilla in a large bowl until pale and creamy. Add the eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition until combined. Use a large metal spoon to fold the almond meal mixture into the egg mixture until well combined.
  3. Spoon the mixture into the prepared pan and smooth the surface. Bake in oven for 55 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean. Set aside in the pan for 10 minutes to cool before turning onto a wire rack to cool completely.
  4. Meanwhile, to make the caramel sauce, combine the caramels and pouring cream in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir until the caramels melt and the mixture is smooth. Set aside to cool to room temperature.
  5. Use a balloon whisk to lightly whisk the double cream in a medium bowl until the cream thickens slightly. Use a large serrated knife to cut the cake in half horizontally. Place the base of the cake, cut-side up, on a cake stand. Spread half the double cream over the cake and top with half the strawberries. Repeat with the remaining cake, double cream and strawberries. Drizzle over the caramel sauce and serve immediately.

Source


Good Taste - May 2007, Page 86
Recipe by Kathy Knudsen


Almond & cherry nougat

Almond & cherry nougat

Almond & cherry nougat


Preparation Time

5 minutes


Cooking Time

25 minutes


Makes

About 16 squares

Ingredients

  • Vegetable oil, to grease
  • 2 edible rice paper sheets
  • 320g (2 cups) almond kernels
  • 285g (1 1/3 cups) caster sugar
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) honey
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) liquid glucose
  • 2 tbs water
  • 1 egg white
  • 2 tsp rosewater
  • 1 x 100g pkt red glace cherries, coarsely chopped

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C. Brush a square 15cm (base measurement) cake pan with oil to lightly grease. Line the base with 1 sheet of rice paper. Spread the almonds over a baking tray. Bake in oven for 8-10 minutes or until toasted. Set aside to cool.
  2. Combine the sugar, honey, glucose and water in a medium saucepan and stir over low heat for 5-7 minutes or until sugar dissolves. Increase heat to high. Bring to the boil. Cook, without stirring, occasionally brushing down the side of the pan with a pastry brush dipped in water, for 4-5 minutes or until a candy thermometer reaches 160°C. Remove from heat.
  3. Meanwhile, use an electric beater to whisk the egg white and rosewater in a clean, dry bowl until firm peaks form. With the motor running, pour the hot sugar-syrup mixture into the egg-white mixture in a thin steady stream. Use a metal spoon to stir in the almonds and cherries. Pour into the prepared pan and press firmly into the base. Top with the remaining rice paper sheet. Set aside in a cool, dry place for 4 hours to set.
  4. Turn nougat onto a chopping board and cut into 2.5cm squares to serve.

Notes & tips

  • Edible rice paper sheets are available from delis and health-food stores. Rosewater is available from specialty spice outlets. If it's unavailable use 1 tbs rosewater essence. You'll need a candy thermometer for this recipe. This nougat will keep for up to 1 week. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dark place.

Source


Good Taste - December 2005, Page 21
Recipe by Sarah Hobbs


After-dinner choc-ices

After-dinner choc-ices


After-dinner choc-ices


These ice-cream treats are the perfect way to finish dinner. Or have after lunch. Or as a snack. Or anytime really...

Ingredients (serves 8)

  • 700ml vanilla ice-cream
  • 200g good-quality dark chocolate
  • 25g milk chocolate

Method

  1. Cover a large, flat baking tray with foil. Place small scoops of vanilla ice-cream on the tray and freeze until hard.
  2. Melt chocolates in separate bowls over pans of simmering water. Once melted, set aside to cool.
  3. Transfer ice-cream scoops to a wire rack over a baking tray and spoon the dark chocolate over each scoop; it should harden immediately.
  4. Garnish each with a little of the milk chocolate. Freeze until firm before serving.

Source


delicious. - January 2003, Page 147
Recipe by Valli Little


Affogato

Affogato

Affogato


Ingredients (serves 6)

  • 1 litre vanilla bean ice-cream
  • 1 cup freshly brewed strong espresso coffee
  • 1/2 cup (125ml) Frangelico liqueur

Method

  1. Place generous scoops of ice-cream into individual serving glasses. Serve together with individual shot glasses of coffee and Frangelico. When ready to eat, guests pour coffee and liqueur over ice-cream. Serve with biscotti.

Notes & tips

  • We used Nice Cream Vanilla Bean Ice-cream, which is widely available from good delicatessens.
  • Frangelico is a hazelnut-flavoured liqueur. You can replace it with Kahlua.
  • Kids' Tip: Serve scoops of ice-cream with chocolate sauce and biscotti.

Source


Notebook: - September 2005, Page 143
Recipe by Jane Hann


"Impossible" coconut pie

"Impossible" coconut pie

"Impossible" coconut pie


"Impossible" because it's just not possible to go wrong with this recipe. It's so easy!

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 4 eggs
  • 225g (1 cup) caster sugar
  • 100g unsalted butter, softened
  • 100g slivered almonds
  • 1 cup desiccated coconut
  • 2 tbs grated lemon rind
  • 2 tbs grated orange rind
  • 125ml (1/2 cup) lemon juice
  • 125ml (1/2 cup) orange juice
  • 250ml (1 cup) coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup plain flour, sifted
  • Lightly whipped cream and fresh passionfruit pulp, to serve

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C.
  2. Place the eggs, sugar, butter, almonds, coconut, lemon and orange rind and juice, coconut milk and flour in a food processor and blend until well combined. Pour into a buttered 28cm pie plate. Bake for 1 hour until lightly browned. Set aside to cool, then refrigerate for 1 hour to chill.
  3. Slice and serve with a little whipped cream and passionfruit.

Source


delicious. - January 2002, Page 71
Recipe by Valli Little



'Bubble wrap' mousse

'Bubble wrap' mousse

'Bubble wrap' mousse


Ingredients (serves 8)

  • 250g white chocolate, broken into pieces
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup (55g) caster sugar
  • 300ml thickened cream
  • 2 x 150g boxes Lindt Lindor White chocolate balls

Method

  1. Melt chocolate in a heatproof bowl over a pan of simmering water (don't let the bowl touch the water). Remove from the heat, then stir until smooth. Set aside to cool.
  2. Meanwhile, separate 2 eggs and set the eggwhites aside. Place the 2 egg yolks, remaining whole egg, vanilla extract and 2 tablespoons sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer and beat until thick and pale.
  3. Lightly whip the thickened cream to soft peaks. Fold melted chocolate and cream into egg mixture until combined.
  4. In a separate bowl with clean beaters, beat eggwhites with remaining 1 tbs caster sugar until soft peaks form. Fold into egg mixture to just combine, keeping as much air in the mixture as possible. Place mousse in a glass serving dish and cover with a layer of Lindor balls. Chill for 4-6 hours until mousse is set, then serve.

Source


delicious. - December 2008, Page 138
Recipe by Valli Little


Lemon meringue puddings

Lemon meringue puddings

Lemon meringue puddings


Ingredients (serves 6)

  • 300ml milk
  • 150ml pure (thin) cream
  • Grated rind of 1 lemon
  • 4 eggs, separated,
  • plus 1 extra egg yolk
  • 175g caster sugar
  • 2 cups (140g) fresh white breadcrumbs
  • 1 cup lemon curd (see related recipe)

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 160°C.
  2. Place the milk, cream and grated rind in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to just below boiling point. Beat the yolks with 100g caster sugar until combined. Carefully stir the milk into the egg mixture, then stir in breadcrumbs. Divide among six 200ml-capacity pie dishes. Bake for 30 minutes until just set.
  3. Increase the oven to 170°C. Beat the eggwhites in a clean bowl with electric beaters until soft peaks form. Gradually add remaining sugar, beating as you go, until stiff peaks form. Spread puddings with the lemon curd, then top with the meringue, making small peaks all over. Bake for 5-8 minutes or until meringue is tinged golden.

Source


delicious. - August 2007, Page 104
Recipe by Valli Little


Little lemon cheesecakes

Little lemon cheesecakes


Little lemon cheesecakes


Preparation Time

15 minutes


Cooking Time

30 minutes


Makes

4

Ingredients

  • Melted butter, to grease
  • 1 x 250g pkt ginger nut biscuits (Arnott's brand)
  • 75g plain sweet biscuits
  • 125g butter, melted
  • 2 x 250g pkts cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 100g (1/2 cup) caster sugar
  • 2 tsp finely grated lemon rind
  • 2 eggs

Lemon curd

  • 2 tsp finely grated lemon rind
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) fresh lemon juice
  • 100g (1/2 cup) caster sugar
  • 40g butter, chopped
  • 2 eggs, lightly whisked

Method

  1. Brush four 12cm (base measurement) springform pans with melted butter to lightly grease. Place the biscuits in the bowl of a food processor and process until finely crushed. Add the butter and process until well combined. Divide the biscuit mixture among prepared pans. Use a straight-sided glass to evenly spread and press the biscuit mixture firmly over the base and side of each pan. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for 30 minutes to chill.
  2. Preheat oven to 180°C. Use an electric beater to beat the cream cheese, sugar and lemon rind in a bowl until smooth. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition until combined. Pour mixture evenly among biscuit bases. Place on a baking tray. Bake in oven for 30 minutes or until just set in the centre. Turn oven off. Leave cheesecakes in oven, with the door ajar, for 2 hours or until cooled completely (this will prevent cakes from cracking). Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for 2 hours to chill.
  3. Meanwhile, to make the lemon curd, combine the lemon rind and juice, sugar, butter and eggs in a saucepan over low heat. Cook, stirring, for 5 minutes or until mixture thickens. Strain through a fine sieve into a jug. Set aside for 15 minutes to cool.
  4. Pour lemon curd over each cheesecake. Place in the fridge for 1 hour to chill.

Source


Good Taste - July 2005, Page 71
Recipe by Sarah Hobbs


Yoghurt, passionfruit & banana Eton mess

Yoghurt, passionfruit & banana Eton mess

Yoghurt, passionfruit & banana Eton mess


Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 1/2 cup (75g) icing sugar
  • 2 passionfruit, plus extra to serve
  • 1/2 cup (125ml) pure (thin) cream
  • 1 cup (280g) thick Greek yoghurt
  • 1 tsp vanilla-bean paste (see note)
  • 6 x 10g pavlova nests*, broken into 2cm chunks
  • 2 bananas, sliced

Method

  1. Stir half the sugar in a pan with 1/4 cup (60ml) cold water over low heat until sugar dissolves. Increase heat to medium-low and simmer, without stirring, for 1 minute, then set aside to cool. Stir passionfruit pulp into cooled syrup, then set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, whip cream to soft peaks with a whisk or electric beaters. Fold in yoghurt, vanilla-bean paste and remaining sugar. Fold meringue into yoghurt mixture, then stir in the banana and half the passionfruit syrup. Spoon into glasses, top with the remaining passionfruit syrup and serve with the extra fresh passionfruit pulp.

Notes & tips

  • Available from supermarkets.
  • If you prefer, omit the passionfruit syrup and just use the pulp of 2 passionfruit. Try this classic English dessert with other seasonal fruit, such as mango and berries.

Source


delicious. - October 2007, Page 134
Recipe by Olivia Andrews


Flourless chocolate cake

Flourless chocolate cake

Flourless chocolate cake


Just because it's Monday, doesn't mean you can't eat chocolate cake. In any case, this flourless version is low in both carbs and fat, so it's free of sin and full of taste!


Preparation Time

15 minutes


Cooking Time

40 minutes



Ingredients (serves 8)

  • Melted reduced-fat dairy spread, to grease
  • 50g (1/2 cup) cocoa powder
  • 80ml (1/3 cup) hot water
  • 2 tsp instant coffee powder
  • 2 tsp boiling water
  • 1 x 100g pkt almond meal
  • 100g (1/2 cup) caster sugar
  • 3 eggs, separated
  • Strawberries, washed, sliced, to serve

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C. Brush a round 22cm (base measurement) cake pan with melted dairy spread to lightly grease. Line the base with non-stick baking paper.
  2. Combine the cocoa powder and hot water in a medium bowl. Combine the instant coffee powder and boiling water in a cup. Add the coffee to the cocoa mixture and stir until combined.
  3. Add almond meal, sugar and egg yolks to cocoa mixture, and stir until well combined.
  4. Use an electric beater to whisk egg whites in a clean, dry bowl until soft peaks form. Use a metal spoon to fold a spoonful of egg whites into cocoa mixture until combined. Gently fold in remaining egg whites until just combined.
  5. Pour mixture into prepared pan. Place cake pan in a roasting pan. Pour enough boiling water into the roasting pan to reach two-thirds of the way up the side of the cake pan. Bake in preheated oven for 40 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean. Remove from oven. Remove cake pan from water bath and set aside for 20 minutes to cool. Turn cake onto a wire rack and remove paper. Set aside for a further 20 minutes or until cooled to room temperature.
  6. Cut cake into wedges and carefully transfer to serving plates. Serve with strawberries.

Source


Good Taste - October 2004, Page 96
Recipe by Jan Purser


White-chocolate panna cotta with coffee syrup

White-chocolate panna cotta with coffee syrup

White-chocolate panna cotta with coffee syrup


Preparation Time

5 minutes


Cooking Time

10 minutes


Equipment

You will need eight 150ml capacity dariole moulds for this recipe.



Ingredients (serves 8)

  • 600ml thickened cream
  • 1 x 180g pkt white chocolate, broken into small pieces
  • 160ml (2/3 cup) milk
  • 140g (2/3 cup) caster sugar
  • 2 tbs boiling water
  • 3 tsp powdered gelatine
  • 200ml freshly brewed strong espresso coffee
  • 60g (1/4 cup) white sugar

Method

  1. Place cream, chocolate, milk and caster sugar in a saucepan over low heat. Cook, stirring, for 3-4 minutes or until chocolate melts and mixture is smooth.
  2. Place the boiling water in a heatproof bowl. Sprinkle with gelatine and whisk with a fork to remove any lumps. Set aside for 3 minutes or until gelatine dissolves. Add gelatine to cream mixture and whisk to combine. Pour among eight 150ml capacity dariole moulds. Place on a baking tray. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for 6 hours to set.
  3. Meanwhile, place the coffee and white sugar in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, for 3 minutes or until sugar dissolves. Set aside to cool.
  4. Dip moulds, 1 at a time, into hot water for 1-2 seconds, then turn onto serving plates. Drizzle with coffee syrup to serve.


Source


Good Taste - November 2005, Page 78
Recipe by Michelle Noerianto


Blackforest cheesecake

Blackforest cheesecake

Blackforest cheesecake


Preparation Time

15 minutes


Cooking Time

50 minutes



Ingredients (serves 8)

  • Melted butter, to grease
  • 200g plain chocolate biscuits
  • 125g butter, melted
  • 200g good-quality dark cooking chocolate, chopped
  • 1 tbs boiling water
  • 1 tsp gelatine
  • 2 x 250g pkt cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 70g (1/3 cup, firmly packed) brown sugar
  • 1 x 670g jar morello cherries
  • 2 tbs caster sugar
  • 1 tbs cornflour
  • White chocolate curls, to decorate

Method

  1. Brush a shallow 10 x 34cm (base measurement) fluted tart tin, with removable base, with melted butter to lightly grease.
  2. Place biscuits in the bowl of a food processor and process until finely crushed. Add butter and process until combined. Transfer to prepared pan. Use a glass to spread and press mixture firmly over base and sides of pan. Place in the fridge for 30 minutes to chill.
  3. Place chocolate in a heatproof bowl over a saucepan of simmering water (make sure bowl doesn't touch water) and stir until melted.
  4. Place water in a heatproof glass. Sprinkle with gelatine and stir with a fork until it dissolves.
  5. Use an electric beater to beat cream cheese and brown sugar in a bowl until smooth. Add chocolate and gelatine, and beat until combined. Spoon into base and use a knife to smooth the surface. Place in fridge for 1 hour to chill.
  6. Meanwhile, drain cherries and reserve syrup. Combine sugar and cornflour in a saucepan. Gradually add the syrup. Cook, stirring, over medium heat for 5 minutes or until sauce boils. Remove from heat. Add the cherries. Set aside for 30 minutes to cool.
  7. Slice cheesecake. Serve topped with cherries and chocolate curls.

Source


Good Taste - July 2005, Page 74
Recipe by Sarah Hobbs


Mango, raspberry & passionfruit trifle

Mango, raspberry & passionfruit trifle

Mango, raspberry & passionfruit trifle


Preparation Time

20 minutes



Ingredients (serves 8)

  • 300g fresh or frozen raspberries, thawed in juice
  • 2 tbs icing sugar, sifted
  • 300g madeira cake, cut into 5cm squares 1cm thick
  • 150ml sweet sherry
  • 2 large mangoes, cheeks removed, flesh cut into 2cm cubes
  • 1 x 1kg ctn Dairy Farmers Thick Custard
  • 1 x 300ml ctn Dairy Farmers Thickened Cream
  • 2 passionfruit, halved, pulp removed
  • 120g fresh raspberries, extra, to serve

Method

  1. Place the raspberries and icing sugar in the bowl of a food processor and process until smooth. Strain into a bowl through a fine sieve. Discard the seeds.
  2. Place the cake in the base of a serving bowl and drizzle with sherry. Spoon over the raspberry puree and top with half the mango. Pour the custard evenly over the mango.
  3. Use an electric beater to whisk the cream in a bowl until soft peaks form. Strain the passionfruit pulp into a bowl through a fine sieve. Discard seeds. Add passionfruit pulp to cream and gently fold until just combined. Spoon cream mixture over the custard. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for 1 hour to chill.
  4. Top with the remaining mango and extra raspberries to serve.

Source


Good Taste - December 2005, Page 81




Chocolate fondue

Chocolate fondue

Chocolate fondue


Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 300ml thickened cream
  • 1/4 cup Cointreau liqueur
  • 300g dark chocolate, finely chopped
  • fresh fruit, such as strawberries, orange segments, banana, raspberries and kiwifruit, to serve
  • 250g packet marshmallows

Method

  1. Heat cream in a saucepan over medium heat until almost boiling. Stir in Cointreau.
  2. Place chocolate in a heatproof bowl. Pour hot cream mixture over chocolate. Stir with a metal spoon until melted and smooth. Pour into a warm bowl or small ceramic fondue.
  3. Serve chocolate fondue with fruit and marshmallows.

Source


Super Food Ideas - October 2005, Page 90
Recipe by Dixie Elliott


Mocha date self-saucing puddings

Mocha date self-saucing puddings

Mocha date self-saucing puddings


Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 1 cup self-raising flour
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup caster sugar
  • 150g (about 6) fresh dates, deseeded, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 egg
  • 75g butter, melted, cooled
  • cream or vanilla ice-cream, to serve

Sauce

  • 2/3 cup firmly-packed brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
  • 1 1/3 cups boiling water
  • 1 tablespoon instant espresso coffee powder

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C. Grease four 1 1/4-cup capacity, ovenproof ramekins and place on a baking tray lined with baking paper.
  2. Sift flour and cocoa into a large bowl. Stir in caster sugar and dates (make sure dates don't clump). Whisk vanilla, milk, egg and butter together in a jug. Pour into flour mixture. Gently stir to combine. Spoon into prepared dishes. Smooth surface.
  3. Make sauce: Combine brown sugar and cocoa in a bowl. Sprinkle over puddings. Combine boiling water and coffee powder in a heatproof jug, stirring to dissolve coffee. Pour 1/3 cup coffee over the back of a metal spoon, over each pudding.
  4. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until a skewer inserted halfway into puddings comes out clean and sauce bubbles around the edges. Serve immediately with cream or ice-cream.

Source


Super Food Ideas - August 2006, Page 84
Recipe by Annette Forrest

Berry parfaits

Berry parfaits

Berry parfaits


This super-easy dessert makes the most of summer's beautiful berries.

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 400g low-fat vanilla yoghurt
  • 1/2 cup thickened cream, whipped
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated orange rind
  • 1/2 cup icing sugar mixture, sifted
  • 250g strawberries, hulled, quartered
  • 125g raspberries
  • 125g blueberries

Method

  1. Combine yoghurt, cream, orange rind and half the sugar in a bowl.
  2. Combine berries in a bowl. Reserve one-quarter of the mixed berries. Using a fork, lightly crush remaining berries. Stir in remaining sugar.
  3. Layer yoghurt mixture and crushed berries in 4 glasses. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes, if time permits. Top with reserved berries. Serve.

Source


Super Food Ideas - February 2008, Page 44
Recipe by Liz Macri

Berry meringue smash

Berry meringue smash

Berry meringue smash


Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 2 cups frozen berries (such as raspberries or mixed berries)
  • 150ml thickened cream
  • 100g packet pavlova nests
  • 100g white chocolate, roughly chopped

Method

  1. Place berries on a large plate lined with paper towel. Stand at room temperature for 5 minutes to partially thaw.
  2. Using an electric mixer, beat cream until soft peaks form. Using your fingers, gently crush pavlova nests. Add crushed pavlova and white chocolate to cream. Gently stir to combine.
  3. Transfer fruit to a bowl. Gently mash fruit with a fork. Add to cream mixture, stirring until just combined (do not overmix or mixture will turn pink).
  4. Spoon into four 3/4-cup capacity glasses. Cover. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Source


Super Food Ideas - September 2005, Page 86
Recipe by Dixie Elliott

hocolate berry tiramisu cake

Chocolate berry tiramisu cake


hocolate berry tiramisu cake


Ingredients (serves 8)

  • 600ml thickened cream
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup caster sugar
  • 500g mascarpone cheese
  • 1 1/3 cups freshly brewed strong coffee, cooled
  • 2/3 cup hazelnut-flavoured liqueur
  • 500g packet Unibic Sponge Finger biscuits
  • 250g frozen raspberries
  • 250g frozen blueberries
  • 100g dark chocolate, grated

Method

  1. Line a 24cm (base) springform cake pan with non-stick baking paper.
  2. Whip cream until soft peaks form. Stir in vanilla and sugar. Whip until thick. Add mascarpone and stir gently to combine.
  3. Combine coffee and liqueur in a shallow dish. Dip biscuits, 1 at time, into coffee mixture and use to line base of pan (cut to fit, if necessary). Top with a third of the mascarpone mixture, half the berries and a third of the chocolate. Repeat layers.
  4. Top chocolate with a final layer of soaked biscuits, remaining mascarpone mixture and remaining chocolate. Cover and refrigerate overnight to allow biscuits to soften and flavours to develop. Serve.


Source


Super Food Ideas - May 2005, Page 36
Recipe by Alison Roberts

Key lime pie

Key lime pie

Key lime pie


Preparation Time

15 minutes


Cooking Time

40 minutes

Ingredients (serves 6)

  • 200g wheatmeal or Granita biscuits
  • 1/4 cup ground almonds
  • 1 tbs caster sugar
  • 100g butter, melted
  • 4 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 395g can condensed milk
  • 2/3 cup (160ml) cream
  • Finely grated rind and juice of 4 limes

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 170°C. Line base of a 20cm springform tin with baking paper.
  2. Process biscuits until fine crumbs. Add almonds, sugar and butter, process until combined. Press mixture firmly into the base and 3cm up sides of tin. Refrigerate.
  3. Whisk eggs, milk, cream, lime rind and juice until smooth. Pour into biscuit crust.
  4. Place on tray and bake for 40-45 mins or until set. Cool. Serve with extra lime slices.


Source


Fresh Living - 11 July 2005, Page 35
Recipe by Christine Sheppard

White chocolate & passionfruit mousse

White chocolate & passionfruit mousse



White chocolate & passionfruit mousse


Preparation Time

5 minutes


Cooking Time

15 minutes

Ingredients (serves 6)

  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1/4 cup caster sugar
  • 1/2 cup passionfruit pulp
  • 150g white chocolate
  • 300ml thickened cream
  • 3 egg whites
  • 6 medium Easter eggs

Method

  1. Use an electric beater to beat 3 egg yolks and 1/4 cup caster sugar until pale and creamy. Fold in 1/2 cup passionfruit pulp alternately with 150g white chocolate, melted, and cooled slightly. If the chocolate is too hot, the mixture will seize.
  2. Beat 300ml thickened cream until soft peaks form, and in a separate bowl beat 3 egg whites until firm peaks form. Fold into the passionfruit mixture.
  3. Break tops from 6 medium Easter eggs and sit eggs in serving glasses. Fill with mousse and refrigerate for 3-4 hrs or overnight until set. Serve with chocolate shards for dipping.

Source


Fresh Living - 28 March 2005, Page 36

Frozen Chocolate-Covered Cappuccino Crunch Cake



Cappuccino Crunch Cake combines coffee ice cream, pound cake and NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® Milk Chocolate Morsels for a rich and creamy frozen dessert! This dessert was created by Beth Royals of Richmond, VA.


Frozen Chocolate-Covered Cappuccino Crunch Cake

1 (10 3/4-ounce) frozen pound cake, thawed
3/4 cup heavy whipping cream
1 3/4 cups (11.5 ounce packge) NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® Milk Chocolate Morsels
4 cups (1 quart) coffee ice cream, softened
1 cup frozen whipped topping, thawed
1 3/4 cups coarsely crushed malted milk balls
Frozen whipped topping, thawed (optional)
Coarsely crushed malted milk balls, (optional)

  1. SLICE pound cake into 1/8 to 1/4-inch slices. Place half of the slices on bottom of 9-inch springform pan; press down firmly. Set remaining slices aside.
  2. BRING cream just to a boil in medium saucepan. Remove from heat. Add milk chocolate morsels; let stand 5 minutes. Whisk until well combined and smooth. Pour half of the chocolate mixture over pound cake in pan, spreading evenly to within 1/4-inch of edge of pan. Cover; freeze for 1 1/2 hours or until chocolate is set.
  3. COMBINE softened ice cream and whipped topping in large bowl. Fold in 1 3/4 cups crushed malted milk balls. Spread over chocolate layer in pan. Cover; freeze until ice cream is firm, about 2 hours.
  4. TOP ice cream with remaining pound cake slices; press down firmly. Spread remaining chocolate mixture over pound cake. Cover; freeze at least 6 hours.
  5. TO SERVE: To serve, remove sides of pan. Garnish with additional whipped dessert topping and sprinkle with crushed malted milk balls, if desired. To cut cake easily, run a knife under hot water and dry with a paper towel before making slices.

Makes 16 servings.


Preparation - 30 min | Cooling Time - 9 hrs 30 min freezing |




Rosemary-Kissed Chocolate Satin Tart




Chocolate embraces a savory enhancement in this decadent dessert. With the infusion of fresh rosemary, taste buds - and hearts - will flutter.


Rosemary-Kissed Chocolate Satin Tart


2 cups ground shortbread cookies
5 tablespoons cold unsalted butter
1/4 cup granulated sugar
2 cups (12-ounce package) NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® Semi-Sweet Chocolate Morsels
1 can (12-ounce) can NESTLÉ® CARNATION® Evaporated Milk
2 large egg yolks
3 sprigs fresh rosemary or 1/3 cup fresh mint sprigs
Sweetened whipped cream for garnish (optional)

  1. PREHEAT oven to 350°F (175°C).
  2. PLACE ground cookies, butter and sugar in food processor; process until mixture clumps together. Press onto bottom of ungreased 9- or 10-inch tart pan with removable bottom.
  3. BAKE for 8 minutes or until golden. Cool in pan on wire rack.
  4. PLACE morsels in large bowl; set aside. Whisk together evaporated milk and egg yolks in medium, heavy-duty saucepan. Stir in rosemary. Heat over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, for 8 to 10 minutes or until mixture is very hot (not boiling) and thickens slightly. Strain mixture over morsels, pressing against rosemary to release flavor. Stir mixture until morsels are melted and mixture is completely smooth.
  5. POUR into crust; refrigerate for 4 hours or until firm. Top each slice with dollop of whipped cream before serving.

Makes 16 servings.

Estimated Times: Preparation - 10 min | Cooking - 16 min | Cooling Time - 4 hrs refrigerating

Chocolate Citrus Freeze



What better to escape the summer heat than the combination of chocolate mousse and ice cream? Great for family BBQ's, this recipe is sure to cool off any dedicated August baker.

Chocolate Citrus Freeze
1 3/4 cups (11.5 ounce package) NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® Milk Chocolate Morsels - divided use
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup finely crushed chocolate wafer cookies (about 16 cookies)
2 tablespoons butter, melted
1 3/4 cups heavy whipping cream, divided
4 tablespoons powdered sugar
1 1/2 cups lowfat orange sherbet ice cream, softened slightly
  1. MICROWAVE 1 1/4 cups morsels and 3/4 cup cream in medium, uncovered, microwave-safe bowl on MEDIUM-HIGH (70%) power for 1 minute; STIR. Morsels may retain some of their original shape. If necessary, microwave at additional 10- to 15-second intervals, stirring just until smooth. Stir in vanilla extract. Cool to room temperature.
  2. LINE 9 x 5-inch loaf pan with 2 overlapping sheets of plastic wrap, allowing 4-inch overhang on all sides.
  3. COMBINE crushed cookies and butter in medium bowl. Press onto bottom of prepared loaf pan.
  4. BEAT 3/4 cup cream and powdered sugar in small chilled mixer bowl until stiff peaks form. Carefully fold whipped cream into chocolate mixture until blended. Spoon half of chocolate mousse (about 1 1/2 cups) over cookie layer; smooth top. Freeze for 2 hours or until very firm. Cover and refrigerate remaining chocolate mousse.
  5. SPOON sherbet over frozen chocolate layer; smooth top. Freeze for 2 hours or until very firm.
  6. SPOON remaining chocolate mousse over sherbet layer; smooth top. Freeze for 2 hours or until very firm.
  7. MICROWAVE remaining 1/2 cup morsels and remaining 1/4 cup cream in small, uncovered, microwave-safe bowl on MEDIUM-HIGH (70%) power for 1 minute; STIR. If necessary, microwave at additional 10- to 15-second intervals, stirring just until smooth. Cool for 10 minutes. Spread evenly over mousse layer. Freeze for 4 hours or overnight.

Makes 12 servings.

NOTE: Full freezing time is necessary. Each layer must be frozen solid before topped with the next layer for a clean result.

TIPS:

  • May be layered with other flavors of sherbet or ice cream.
  • To cut slices more easily, run hot water over knife blade and dry prior to cutting.

Nutritional Information Per Serving: Calories: 380 Calories from Fat: 230 Total Fat: 26 g Saturated Fat: 16 g Cholesterol: 60 mg Sodium: 90 mg Carbohydrates: 38 g Dietary Fiber: 0 g Sugars: 30 g Protein: 4 g


Watermelon Ice Cream Bombe




Bursting with a flavorful and refreshing blend of fruit sorbet, light vanilla ice cream, and chocolate morsels, this watermelon-inspired dessert is a wonderful finale to Independence Day celebrations.

Watermelon Ice Cream Bombe
4 cups lime sherbet, slightly softened
5 cups Vanilla SLOW CHURNED Light Ice Cream
1 quart Strawberry or Raspberry HÄAGEN-DAZS Fat Free Sorbet
1/2 cup NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Morsels
  1. LINE 2-quart bowl with plastic wrap, making sure wrap hangs over side of the bowl by at least 4 inches.
  2. SPOON sherbet into large mixer bowl; beat with mixer or stir with spoon until smooth. Spoon sherbet into prepared bowl, pressing into the bottom and up the side with the back of a spoon to form a smooth layer. Freeze for 30 minutes. Remove vanilla ice cream from freezer and allow to soften for 10 minutes; spoon into large mixer bowl and beat with mixer or stir with spoon until smooth. Add to bowl with sherbet, smoothing it over the sherbet in a thin layer. Freeze for 30 minutes.
  3. REMOVE sorbet from the freezer and allow to soften for 10 minutes. Spoon sorbet into large mixer bowl and beat with mixer or stir with spoon until smooth; stir in morsels. Spoon sorbet mixture over ice cream so it fills the remaining space and fills the bowl. Smooth down top; cover with plastic overhang, then add another sheet of plastic wrap. Freeze for at least 6 hours or up to 1 week.
  4. TO UNMOLD, remove plastic wrap from top of bowl. Gently tug at the plastic overhang to loosen the bombe from the bowl. (If the bombe is difficult to remove from the bowl, set it in a large bowl filled with warm water for 8 to 10 seconds.) Place a serving platter over the bowl, invert and shake to release bombe. Peel away plastic wrap, then cut bombe into wedges. Serve immediately.

Makes 16 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving: Calories: Calories: 220 Calories from Fat: 45 Total Fat: 5 g Saturated Fat: 3 g Cholesterol: 15 mg Sodium: 45 mg Carbohydrates: 42 g Dietary Fiber: 1 g Sugars: 34 g Protein: 3 g


Shows

There was an error in this gadget

50 Weight Loss Tips

I lost 30 pounds in three months. If you wanted to know how I did it, and how I intend on maintaining my current weight, then these 50 weight loss tips are for you. I’m not an expert, but I do speak from experience. If it helps you attain your own weight loss goals, then I’m happy to have helped (if only to serve as a reinforcement of knowledge you already possess). Most of this, I learned on my own or through close friends and family members. Ponzi’s been a great help through the entire process, being a model partner in the weight loss process. Feel free to add your own tips to this list, too! If someone wants to help me extend these points into a full-on eBook, I’m all ears.


1. Dietary control and exercise. It’s true what they say - all you need to do is watch what you eat, and expend more energy than you consume. It’s really that simple. You can quit reading this list now, you now know everything you need to know and didn’t need to fork over $500 for the privilege of me telling you the secret of losing weight. You don’t need to read a 4,000 page book, you don’t have to buy a tape series, you don’t need to stay up late at night to watch infomercials to understand this basic premise. It’s 100% true.

2. Change your lifestyle. If you’re calling this a “diet,” then you’re going to gain all the weight back (and more) within a few months of losing it. Diets do not work. Diets are temporary. When you change your dietary lifestyle, however, you’re changing your habits - and you’re putting yourself on track for long-term / continued success and weight maintenance. Don’t ever tell anybody you’re on a diet - ever. I’m speaking from experience, here - a reformed low-carber. Worked out well for a while, but ultimately failed because my entire lifestyle didn’t change (permanently).


3. Join an online support group. In my case, I created my own - FatBlasters. It’s essential that you not feel alone, and reaching out to friends (new or old) is typically a smart move. I just heard about PeetTrainer, but didn’t know about it when I began down the road to weight loss. You have to know that others are out there for moral support - they know things that you couldn’t possibly know, and they’ve probably been “in your shoes” at some point in the past (or present). Share stories, laughter, tears, successes, and failures - share them. There are thousands of communities out there, so keep looking until you find the one that fits you.


4. Take before and after photos. I know it sucks to see yourself as a chunky monkey (sorry, that’s what I called myself - if only to get myself motivated to meet my weight loss goal). However, there’s no easier way to illustrate your progress. The “after” photos are far more fun to capture and share, admittedly. Find yourself on Flickr! It’s good to see yourself how others see you. Do you like how you look? In many ways, Flickr helped me lose weight.


5. Hire a substitute teacher. Don’t reach for the brands you know and love immediately - or without thinking first. Eggs are “good” for you, but consider using egg substitutes instead (in fact, many restaurants will let you order lower calorie foods). There are countless “lower” alternatives for you to try. If something different doesn’t taste good, by all means - find a better substitute, or eat less of the original. In some cases, the substitute may be worse for you than the regular version of the product. The good news is, healthier choices are silently replacing their “normal” counterparts - and they taste just as nice.


6. Start reading labels. I know it sucks, but you have to do it - and there’s no way to avoid this tip. If you don’t know what you’re putting in your mouth, you’re flying blind. Don’t assume, either - triple-check the ingredients list and serving sizes. You must rely on yourself for this; nobody else is going to be able to lose the weight or do the math for you. It’s not that complicated a task, but it will require effort. If nothing else, just pay attention to the calorie count.


7. What’s so funny about bovines? If you like cheese, you must buy the Laughing Cow brand, and keep several of the suckers in stock at all times. The individually-wrapped wedges make for excellent snacks, and are wonderful when melted over just about anything edible. I’d be careful about straight-up American cheese, though - it’s oil, but not necessarily as good for you as (say) a slice of cheddar would be. I have yet to find something as calorie-light and filling as Laughing Cow (I don’t know how they do it).


8. Tell your family. You’re not going to lose the weight alone, even if you ARE alone in losing the weight. If you’ve got a family at home, talk to them about it - initially, not incessantly. Let them know what you’re going to do, and that you want (and need) their support. If you don’t let them know, you’re running the risk of them inadvertently sabotaging your efforts. You want them to help you get to your goal(s). You want them to share in your happiness when you’ve made it past a certain mark. Who knows? Maybe some of your new habits will rub off on them and they’ll become healthier people, too?


9. Go public. I didn’t want to admit that I had screwed up, but admitting the problem in public was the first step on the path to eventual success. I was now accountable for my actions, and all my friends knew what I was doing. There was no turning back, otherwise I’d be risk damaging my integrity. I didn’t want to disappoint the people who read me on a regular (or semi-regular) basis. Plus, it’s an easy way to find out which of your friends have gone through the process before - and glean tips from their own experiences. Then, other friends might become inspired to do the same thing you’re doing once they see that you’ve taken the first step.


10. Identify your exercise. No exercise was created equal. You might like running, so run. You might like jogging, so jog. You might like stationary bikes, so bike stationarily. Find the one that works best for you - that isn’t too much of a chore for you to do regularly throughout the week. Don’t pick a routine that you don’t like - or you won’t want to do it, and you certainly won’t stick with it for long. I also wouldn’t recommend buying into that whole “no pain, no gain” mantra. I’ve lost weight without hurting myself, and you probably can, too.


11. Become a Gazelle. You’ve probably seen Tony Little on TV, selling his Gazelle glider - a low impact exercise machine. I can tell you: it works. It’s easy on my legs, and really gives me a workout when I apply myself on it. Some people say it’s awkward to use, but I love mine - and would consider recommending no other home exercise equipment at this point. Then again, I’m a wimpy geek who only wants to burn calories.


12. Zone out. There’s a reason why people exercise to their favorite music - listening to external stimulus takes your mind off of the physical activity. That’s the secret to making “exercise time” fly. If you’re concentrating on what your body is doing, the session is going to drag on for what will seem like days. Buy a portable music player, or situate yourself in front of a television.

1) The Carb Rotation Diet.
2)
Eat-Weight-Off- Lose 10 Lbs In One Week.
3)
Diet & Fitness.

13. Never count on live programming. It’s important to stimulate your mind while your body is exerting itself in other ways. However, never rely on “what’s on TV or the radio” at the time. Instead of zoning out, you’ll find yourself flipping between channels - and that’s going to make the time drag as much as it would if you weren’t keeping your mind busy in the first place. “Live” is a very bad idea. Go with pre-recorded programming or go without.


14. Video games helped me lose weight. I can keep my balance on the Gazelle (which some might find difficult to do). As such, I plugged an Xbox 360 into the TV and started to play it while I was working out. Immediately, I found that I was sweating more than I was when I was only watching TV passively! The reason boils down to a single word: adrenalin. Now, the only way I’m able to work up a sweat is when I play a fast-paced game on the game console. Yes, even game genre is important; avoid any diversions that require long pauses between tasks. Racing games (like Burnout) have worked very well for me. The more mindless the game, the better your burn, the faster the exercise session will go.


15. Set realistic goals. You can lose 50 pounds in a week if you work out 12 hours a day and eat nothing but celery - but not if you’re human. Slow and steady wins the race. Don’t bite off more than you can chew - literally. Make small goals on your way to the bigger goal(s). In the end, you’ll have achieved more (and more frequently, might I add).


16. Avoid trans fats and high fructose corn syrup. I offer this suggestion for a few reasons. First, they’re not good for you anyway. Second, you’ll eliminate a lot of the “bad foods” outright - no questions asked. You’ll have to become more selective in what you eat by avoiding these two nasty ingredients - which are in more foods than you probably care to know.


17. Don’t always listen to your mate. I’ve already suggested that you tell your family - but sometimes members of your family will try to dissuade you from trying to lose weight. It’s simple: they might not want you to succeed where they may have already failed, whether consciously or inadvertently. Your loss is not always their gain. Watch out for statements like: “You’ve lost enough weight.” or “I like you just the way you are.” Fact of the matter is, if YOU don’t like the way that YOU are - then YOU are going to have to do something about it, no matter what anybody says. They still love you, though (in theory).


18. Don’t compare yourself to others. Every body is different. It stands to reason that everybody will lose weight differently. Even if you do the exact same things that I do, you won’t lose weight at the same rate. The key is in finding your triggers. Keep your goal in sight, and do whatever you have to do to meet that goal. When you start looking at someone else’s habits, you’re only going to become discouraged and quit without even realizing that it’s physically impossible to be anybody but yourself.


19. Women aren’t men. It’s been proven that men can lose weight more rapidly than women can, which is likely due to our physiological makeup (women are supposed to have more fat than men, because they’re the birthing gender). This isn’t a sexist statement to make - it’s pretty much the truth. As such, females should expect to set separate goals than males - especially if you’re working on losing weight together, side by side.


20. Take a magic pill. Nonsense! There is no such thing as a magic pill. Don’t fall victim to the hype of the latest fat-burning drug commercial. If you listen or read closely, you’ll see that every single one of these things is effective when combined with proper diet and exercise (which they even state in their advertisements). The side-effects for these drugs are usually worse than your additional weight, anyway.


21. Vitamins are good for you. If you’re going to take any pills, let them be natural supplements (like Essential Fatty Acids or multivitamins). Be careful about overdoing it, though - especially with herbal remedies. Too much of anything is a bad thing. You can consult a nutritionist, but always buy on your own - and keep these supplements to a minimum. Remember, too, that specific vitamins are no good without specific minerals.


22. Deck your desktop. In the beginning, some of my friends sent me complicated spreadsheets to help chart progress. Uh, no - not for me; I’m the kind of guy who likes taking the easy route. As such, I scoured the Web for the best desktop tool and remembered CalorieKing. You won’t find anything easier to use. Trust me, this is the one; I can keep track of everything I eat and expend (without hassle). While the statistic-addicts will love CalorieKing for its thoroughness, the utility was truly designed with non-geeks in mind. The CalorieKing Web site and service are fine on their own, but the downloadable client is what you really want to get. Pay the registration fee, man - how much is your health worth to you?


23. Identify your ideal weight. If you’re 5′5″ with a certain build, there’s an ideal weight that matches your body type. Find it - and make that your goal. And if you don’t know what that might be, try searching the Web for a calculator (though results and calculations will vary by a small margin). Now you have a weight goal to shoot for.


24. Consider the source. I’m going to make a gross generalization here, but… why would I trust an overweight doctor or nutritionist to give me proper advice on weight loss? “Do as I say and not as I do” is not a maxim I’m willing to accept from anybody who would be qualified to tell me how to do something. Talk to people who are doing it, or who have done it and been successful. You don’t have to mirror their regimen, but at least you’re getting help from someone who’s really been there. Or, as they said in the Christmas episode of “Two and a Half Men,” people who live in fat asses shouldn’t throw waffles.


25. Ignore Ronald McDonald. You don’t have to eliminate fast food completely, but you should avoid it at all costs. Most of it is nasty, bad stuff anyway - if you’d even go as far as to call it food. If you’re looking for convenience, find a more convenient meal source. Besides, most of what they serve would be considered “food product,” not food. There’s a gigantic difference as far as your body is concerned. Your bloodstream does not have taste buds, need I remind you?


26. Scale up. If your measurement tool sucks, upgrade it. If it’s analog, dump it. I’ve talked to many geeks about their choice in scales, and most of them (myself included) recommend something in the Tanita family. They’re high-quality, rugged, accurate devices. Make sure you set your scale on a hard surface, too (as carpet foundations do not make for accurate weight measurements).


27. Watch your weight. Some people say that you shouldn’t weigh yourself more than once a week. I’ve been much happier charting my progress every day. No matter what, you need to weigh in at the same time, every time. For me, that’s 10am every morning (or somewhere thereabout). If you decide to weigh yourself every single day, understand that your weight will fluctuate by one or two pounds - and that you should only keep a serious eye on the lengthier trends.


28. One pound a week. If you’re not losing at least one pound a week on your chosen weight loss regimen, you’re (a) stalled, or (b) finished. You might need to push yourself even harder, or (in some cases) let up a little bit while your body plays catch-up. If you lose more than one pound a week, then you’re doing better than average. Expecting to lose five pounds a week just isn’t realistic, though.


29. Maintain your priorities. Sure, your sandwich would taste amazing with an extra tablespoon of mayonnaise… but do you really need it? Rather, is it more important for you to reach your weight loss goal quicker - or have this sandwich taste marginally better? What’ll happen the next time you’re faced with this decision - will you cave again? It’s a slippery slope; don’t lose sight of what’s most important to you.


30. All weight is not equal. Muscle weighs more than fat, but the last thing you want to lose is muscle! For this reason alone, it’s important to have a regular exercise routine somewhere in your schedule. Without exercise, your body is going to burn through muscle first - and you’ll wind up more imbalanced than you were to begin with. You want your body to burn fat, not muscle. You want to lose weight, but you want to lose “fat” weight - not muscle mass.


31. Counteract the “Rainy Day” principle. If you decrease your calorie count without necessarily increasing your physical activity level, your body is going to crash. It’s going to say to itself: “Holy sh*t! I better store these calories as fat, because I’m not getting enough of them - and I don’t want to die.” When you exercise, you set your body’s process to “burn” instead of “save.”


32. Don’t overdo it. If you change something in your lifestyle, you’re probably going to see results - but there’s a law of diminishing returns at play. You can exercise for an extra hour a day for a week and still lose the same amount as you had when you were only exercising half as much. Give your body time to adjust - don’t push yourself too hard or you’re just going to spend your energy on something that’s not necessarily going to give you immediate and direct benefit. This, of course, only applies to those of you wanting to lose fat - not for those who are training for a triathlon.


33. Patterns are good. Once you’ve found your workout groove, do your best to stick with it. Exercise no less than three times a week for 40 - 60 minutes each time, but don’t feel the “need” to do it more than five times over a seven day period. Your body will likely appreciate a burn-off in the morning more, but if you need to relieve stress in the evening - don’t be afraid to adjust your workout schedule accordingly. Schedule making and keeping are important for other areas of your life as well.


34. Sleep it off. To be an efficient fat-burning machine, your body requires at least eight hours of sleep a night. If you think that you’re doing yourself a favor by sleeping less, you’re mistaken. Give your body time to rest itself, both mentally and physically. Sleep is very, very important (if only for mental alertness for the following day). If you feel tired, that’s likely your body’s way of saying: “Shut your eyes, stupid!”


35. Remember that the fork is not a shovel. I eat fast (I swear I can’t help it). Even if I’m not hungry, I want to shovel everything into my mouth in less than a minute. But my brain doesn’t know that my stomach is full until twenty minutes after it actually is. As such, I could stuff myself silly before realizing I didn’t need to consume as much as I did. Try eating half of what’s on your plate, wait ten minutes, then continue to eat if you’re still hungry. You never want to feel full - ever. That’s when you know you’ve eaten too much. If you want a real hunger-stopper, try an Omega 3 and Omega 6 supplement (EFAs) twenty minutes before a meal.


36. Become your own snack fairy. It’s okay to snack between meals, really. Small meals throughout the day are enough to keep you satisfied, as (much like the sensation of being full) you never want to feel hungry. Let your body know it’s going to get a regular regimen of calories. Plus, if you starve yourself for the regular meals, you’re probably going to eat more before your brain tells your mouth to stop. Think about it: breakfast, lunch, and dinner are social constructs at their very core.


37. Love the oil companies. Just like your car needs high-quality oil, so too does your body. Not all oils were created equal, though it’s hotly contested which ones are better for you than others. Personally, I love a good olive oil - it’s 100% natural and is rich with Omega 9 fatty acids. Enova is another one that we’ve found to work quite well in our lifestyle at home. Choose your oil wisely, though - your weight loss goal should be more than simply cosmetic. It’s a good rule of thumb when it comes to food: the more natural something is, the better it is for you.


38. Fat is where it’s at. If you think you can lose weight and keep it off by avoiding all fats, you’re sadly mistaken. In fact, if you think that low fat eating is the only way to go, you might as well just quit now. Your body (and your brain) needs fat to survive! This is why the scientists call “them” essential fatty acids - Omegas 3, 6, and 9. These fats have been stripped from many supermarket shelf items, and it’s your responsibility to put fat back into your dietary plan. Don’t avoid eating fat, embrace it - equally.


39. Bring balance to the force. If you eat the same foods over and over again, you’re going to get bored - unless they’re foods you really, really like. Feel free to change it up - keep your tongue happy. Balance carbs with proteins with fats, though. If you have more of one nutrient for one meal, try more of another nutrient for the next. And for heaven’s sake, don’t just shop in the “diet” section of the store. You can still (likely) eat the same things you’ve always eaten, just not so much of them at any one time.


40. Know your daily calorie limit. When I was in the process of losing weight, it was suggested that I stay under 1700 calories a day. Knowing that number was half the battle. I could eat anything I wanted throughout the day, so long as I would stay at or beneath that number. While I couldn’t track 100% of the items I ate, I was able to make intake estimates - and adjust my schedule and ration my remaining calories accordingly. In this sense, you’re given extreme freedom - so long as you stay at or beneath that suggested calorie level for your plan. If you don’t know how much you’re supposed to take in, how are you supposed to know how much you’re supposed to take in?! Sounds redundant, but it’s a situation that many “dieters” are in (which is why they fail)!


41. Fiber good. When you start to lose fat, you’re probably going to get constipated. Yeah, it happens more frequently than we care to admit (or share). You should have a good amount of fiber every day, anyway. Fiber is very important to your health (and your weight loss goals). Try the Metamucil snack wafers for a quick fiber infusion. Then, magnesium citrate for those… “stuck” moments, in which you’ll find yourself from time to time. Stick a bottle or two of that in your fridge for safe keeping, and don’t plan on going anywhere for 24 hours after taking a dose (trust me, trust me, trust me).


42. Walk the walk. You burn calories when you walk, did you know that? Certainly, you don’t expend as much energy as you do when you run, but you burn it nonetheless. Consider picking up a good pedometer, if only to gauge how many steps you take in the average day. According to others, the Omron HJ112 Premium Pedometer is the one to beat. If nothing else, knowing how many steps you take on the average day will give you a better idea as to your regular activity level - around the home and/or the office. Plus, you can count those steps as calorie deficits in certain programs (like CalorieKing).


43. Train wrecks will happen. One of these nights, you’re going to go out with friends and eat your weight in steak (likely blowing any kind of progress you had made for that day). Instead of repeating the overindulgence, just put yourself back on track the next day. You’re allowed to “mess up” every now and again, so long as you don’t make a habit out of consuming an excessive amount of food. Right the dining injustice immediately. You’ll be okay. You’ll be fine. Just don’t do it again. And again. And again. And again.


44. Satisfy cravings with extreme prejudice. If you’re hungry for something, eat it. Don’t deny yourself the simple pleasures. If it’s possible, eat only half of what you want. Is your craving satisfied, or are you addicted to the flavor? Losing weight shouldn’t be torture for anybody. You have to ask yourself: Is it more important for me to eat this entire case of fudgesicles, or to look good for my brother’s wedding? Only you have the answer to that question, and if you ignore logic, you’re going to hurt yourself in the long-run. Just take a nibble or two - I won’t tell a soul.


45. Water you waiting for? If you’re not drinking enough water, your body will let you know. Thirst is an amazing sensation - quench it. If you’re not hydrated, your body won’t be working at peak levels. Most of your body happens to be water, by the way. If you’re worried about “water weight,” remember that you’re likely to retain more water when you’re not giving your body enough of it in the first place. Besides, that’s what those workout sessions are supposed to help with every other morning. I’m not going to dictate how many glasses you should drink, though - as that’s going to vary from person to person.


46. Join the soda club. Like most people, I love carbonated beverages. However, unlike most people, I love unflavored carbonated beverages - and if your tongue is attune to sugary-sweet drinks, you’re also the kind of person who believes that club soda tastes salty (even when it contains no sodium). Make the move to an unflavored drink sooner rather than later. If you need help along the way, lemons and limes can be your best friends. If you’re going to drink something more than water, at least make sure it’s not going to hinder your progress. If you’re a sugary-soda drinker, dropping it from your daily routine altogether will help you drop ~5 or more pounds in a single week (WITHOUT doing anything else).


47. Sugar is evil that tastes good. You probably don’t want to hear this, but sugar is a bad thing. The more refined it comes, the more your body is going to react negatively to it. Sugar, sugar, sugar is in everything, everything, everything. If it’s sweet, it’s got sugar in it. There are all sorts of sugars out there, and all of them are ultimately metabolized by the body. It’s a good bet that the sugars in an apple are better for you than the sugars in a candy bar, though. If you’re addicted to sugar, this is going to be a horrible hurdle to overcome.


48. Sugar substitutes are just as evil as sugar itself. Do you really think your body knows how to handle something that was man-made? Seriously. These chemically-adjusted products do not occur in the wild; there are no Splenda trees in warmer climates, nor are there NutraSweet plants in the Arctic. In some instances, taking in sugar substitutes may actually increase your levels of hunger! Let’s not forget about all the health issues that might arise from these unnatural substances. If you’re given a choice, it’s almost better to go with something your body knows how to deal with (real, unprocessed sugar). No, it’s much safer (and healthier) to stay away from blue, pink, and yellow packets entirely. Do a Web search for “Artificial Sweeteners May Damage Diet Efforts.” Then sit there and tell me they’re okay? No way.


49. White bread can’t jump. Did you know that white bread isn’t good for you? Oh, it’s true - just ask any diabetic. Research has shown that people who eat more refined products (like white bread) are more likely to have belly fat. Why? It’s simple: your body isn’t getting what it needs. The food industry isn’t the health industry, okay? You can’t trust that they’ve got your best interests at heart (despite all their marketing efforts). If you want the flavor of white bread, please eat the whole grain white bread instead? Sara lee makes a wonderful loaf, as I can personally attest (even though I like rye more than white or wheat). Repeat after me: whole grain white bread, whole grain white bread.


50. Hasta la pasta, baby. Much like its cousin, white bread, refined pasta can damage your health and pinch your weight loss plans. I’m not saying you should quit pasta altogether, but I will suggest that you change your pasta pusher to Barilla. They have a new wheat pasta that’s a dead ringer for the ol’ crappy white stuff you used to eat. “Barilla PLUS” is absolutely fantastic, as well as a good source of fiber and protein. You’re usually going to be better off with a “wheat” option, although traditional wheat pasta has a texture that you might not like (even though I find it perfectly acceptable to my palate).



Now, once you’ve achieved your weight loss goals, what are you going to do to keep the fat at bay? The worst thing you can do is something I’ve done countless times over: get lazy. I’ve conveniently forgotten about all of the aforementioned rules a few times, and it’s put me back in the same situation I don’t want to be in - ever again. While I don’t have to be as careful as I was during the weight loss period, I’m still measuring myself and recording my daily activities. This may turn into a weekly weigh-in soon enough, as it’s easier to correct yourself at 5lbs than it is at 50lbs. Good luck!